A world without the web

For those of you that know me, you would be aware that I have recently moved house. For those of you that don't, I have recently moved house.

Why we had to move is null and void in this post - just know this: landlords can be peculiar.

Anyway moving on - as with any house move, we had to move all our utilities including the internet. This, in theory, should be a simple affair and in my mind I should only have a week or two downtime. This was not the case. Days after I promised that I would be writing more blog posts, I have found myself in a situation where I have no internet for 5 weeks.

When I first found out about this, I was not too bothered. I didn't think it would affect me much. However, after 5 days in the new flat with no link to the outside world it made me realise how much I use the internet and how much I rely on a network in my house.

I've lost count how many devices connect to the internet in my house (I shall try and recall in a minute) but its trickier than that. I have a Raspberry Pi and Printer which are both controlled and accessed over the network - so I've had to set up a wireless network with no ADSL. Which causes confusion because when my phone is connected to the WiFi I get no internet.

I also have an internet radio which connects to WiFi to get the time, internet stations and to stream music but because of no internet connection out of the network, it just says 12:00 on 1/1/2007 all the time. Which is annoying.

As for devices I now can't really use as there we intended:

  • Phone (x2)
  • Kindle (x2)
  • Macbook
  • iPad
  • Xbox
  • Wii
  • Internet Radio
  • Raspberry Pi
  • Laptop
  • Mobile Phone Signal Booster

That's 12 devices that rely on my internet connection being available. Seeing as my job is in a Web Agency, I feel lost without the internet. Lost, dazed and confused.

To make things worse, the phone reception in my flat is appalling. So its not so easy to "check something out", or "look something up".

Mike Street

Written by Mike Street

Mike is a front-end developer from Brighton, UK. He spends his time writing, cycling and coding. You can find Mike on Twitter.